Fix Your Memory Module
 
Home
News
Products
Shop
Memory
Corporate
Contact
 

News
Industry News
Publications
CST News
Help/Support
Member Area
Tester Brochure
Demo Library
Software
Tester FAQs

biology medicine news product technology definition

Thursday, July 20, 2017
Memory Industry News
Email ArticlePrinter Format PreviousNext

New LI-RAM to reduce memory power by 10%


Thursday, April 20, 2017

The hunt for new and improved technologies never ceases, which is a good thing for the future of computing. As long as our hunger for faster and more powerful PCs continues, then it appears that researchers are up to the task of the continued advancements that we demand.

One area where work continues unabated is in the quest for new and faster memory, where mundane electronic technologies remain at the heart of even the fastest random-access memory (RAM). Researchers at the University of Victoria in British Columbia, Canada, hope to change all of that with their development of a new material that could make RAM perform faster and more efficiently.

The material is dubbed light-induced magnetoresistive RAM (LI-RAM), and it essentially “allows computer chips to exist at a molecular level,” as the university’s blog describes it. Chemist Natia Frank is behind the effort, which aims to reduce the power consumed and heat produced by modern PC processors — to break through the “power wall,” as it is called.

LI-RAM utilizes 10 percent less power than current RAM, produces virtually no heat, and is more durable. On top of all that, it is also faster. What makes LI-RAM special is that it uses light rather than electricity to move information around a system.

As Frank puts it, “The material in LI-RAM has the unusual quality of rapidly changing magnetic properties when hit with green light.” Information is processed and stored on single molecules, making once hypothetical “universal memory” technology possible.

According to the researchers, about 10 percent of all electricity is consumed by information communications technology, while discarded ewaste amounts to 3 million tons of hazardous materials on a global scale. LI-RAM would help alleviate some of those concerns by utilizing less power and lasting longer.

Researchers plan to use the LI-RAM for more than just mobile phones, PCs, and consumer electronics. As Frank explains, “Potentially, this material could have other uses in medical imaging, solar cells and a range of nanotechnologies. This is just the beginning.” It’s anticipated that the technology could make its way into consumer products within the next decade and it is already in the hands of international electronics manufacturers with just that goal in mind.

By: DocMemory
Copyright © 2017 CST, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Email ArticlePrinter Format PreviousNext
Latest Industry News
ZTE profit up 30%7/20/2017
Samsung increased production on HBM2 DRAM7/20/2017
Researchers found quicker way to make rechargable batteries7/20/2017
ASML expects revenue growth from deep EUV 7/20/2017
Toshiba received court order to cancel out WD's original retraining action7/20/2017
Nanya predicts continue DRAM tight supply7/19/2017
Renesas won infringement law suit7/19/2017
Intel is about to release 6 cores Coffee Lake7/19/2017
NOR demand up due to new display and automobile circuit requirements7/19/2017
Qualcomm faces fine in Europe7/18/2017

CST Inc. Memory Tester DDR Tester
Copyright © 1994 - 2017 CST, Inc. All Rights Reserved